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Pygmalion Home
This page updated on Sunday, August 12, 2012 9:50 PM

Essay questions

The following are potential essay questions for Pygmalion. You will answer one from a choice of four of these.

  1. An understanding of the allocation of power within a society is the key to understanding the motivations and actions of characters.” Respond to this statement with reference to any text you have studied.

  2. Discuss the significance of the title of a text you have studied in class this semester.

  3. Drama is about plays in performance. Select a significant scene from Pygmalion and examine how the staging of this scene contributes to the development of at least one theme of this play. Consider costume, props, setting and non verbal language in your answer.

  4. What does knowledge of the context in which a play is written contribute to our understanding of the themes of Pygmalion?

  5. How are class differences constructed in Pygmalion? Consider both verbal and non verbal language in your answer.

  6. How is gender represented by Shaw in Pygmalion? Explore what comment you believe the dramatist is making, being sure to consider in your answer how his ideas were received by the society of his time.

Pygmalion Act 1

Pygmalion  - gender

Study Guide (original no longer available online as a pdf)

 

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Feel free to access these resources for study purposes or classroom use. However where they have been directly dowloaded for distribution or copied and provided as notes, please acknowledge as a courtesy. John Watson